31 Brilliant Facts about Brunettes

By Celeste Hurst, Junior Writer
Published December 20, 2016
  • Although the word “brunette” is used now to mean both men and women, when referring to a man, “brunet” is the correct spelling. “Brunette” can refer to either brown or black hair.[5]
  • Of all hair types, brown hair is the coarsest and the thickest.[6]
  • When it comes to the number of hairs on their head, brunettes are right in the middle with around 100,000 hairs. Blondes average about 120,000 and redheads have around 80,000.[18]
  • Brunettes take less time getting ready in the morning than blondes, with brunettes averaging about 66 minutes to 72 minutes for blondes.[13]
  • When shown pictures of the same woman with blonde, brown, and red hair, men rated the brunette as the most physically attractive.[10]
  • The actress Audrey Hepburn received praise from critics during the 1940s and 1950s for bringing a different kind of sex appeal to films. In a time period where most actresses were blonde, she refused to dye her dark brown hair.[15]
  • It takes a smart brunette to play a dumb blonde.

    - Marilyn Monroe

  • The sequel to a 1953 film titled Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was called Gentlemen Marry Brunettes.[15]
  • The Italian-born and brown-haired actor Rudolph Valentino became the first international male sex symbol of the big screen during the 1920s.[15]
  • A lock of Abraham Lincoln’s dark brown hair sold for $11,905 in 2007.[16]
  • Brown hair replaced blonde hair as the most desirable hair color for women during the 1600s in Europe.[15]
  • Most women with visible hair loss in the United States of America are brunette.[14]
  • Brunettes find it harder to quit smoking than anyone else
  • Brunettes are more likely than anyone else to become addicted to nicotine. The high levels of the pigment melanin in brown hair also make it difficult for the liver to metabolize the nicotine, which keeps it in the system longer and makes it easier to become addicted.[14]
  • Brunettes are more prone to non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a cancer that starts in the lymph nodes, than anyone else.[9]
  • In the 1600s, people used lead combs to darken their hair, not knowing it could lead to kidney failure and death.[15]
  • Since it began in 1959, 76% of the winners of the Rose of Tralee Festival have been brunette. The Rose of Tralee is a festival in Ireland that gathers women with Irish ancestry from all over the world and crowns one of them the Rose of the festival.[11]
  • Brown is the most common hair color all over the world except for in the middle of Sweden and Finland where only about 20% of the population is brunette.[7]
  • When a facial mapping expert in the United Kingdom used a computer program to make composites of the perfect female and male face, both of them had brown hair. The female most closely resembles Natalie Portman, and the male looks most like David Gandy.[1]
  • Charles Darwin once conducted a study with the goal of determining whether more people with brown hair existed because they were more likely to be dependable and settle down and get married. He found the results inconclusive.[8][14]
  • The majority of men in Spain, France, Italy, the United States, and Brazil state they prefer dark-haired women.[2]
  • Brunettes are perceived as intelligent
  • Brunette women are rated as more intelligent than women with other hair colors after first meeting them.[13]
  • Men tend to rate brunette women as less approachable than other women.[4]
  • Female lions prefer mates with dark-colored manes.[12]
  • In a survey of 3,000 men, the majority of them stated they’d rather be in a serious relationship with a brunette than with a blonde because they perceive them to be more reliable.[14]
  • Brunettes are less likely than other people to suffer skin problems because of the increased amounts of the pigment melanin in their hair.[6]
  • While most women who dye their hair blonde or red do so to spark interest, the majority of women who dye their hair a shade of brown do so to cover up gray hairs.[17]
  • A book published in 1996 and titled New Women’s Dress for Success states: “…while blondes may have more fun, brunettes are more successful.”[17]
  • An old Roman recipe for dark hair dye included charred eggs, boiled walnut shells, leeks, and leeches.[15]
  • Some people argue that black hair does not exist and is just very dark brown hair.[3]
  • When including people with black hair, brunettes make up 90% of the world’s population.[3]
  • More shades of brown hair exist than shades of any other hair color.[3]
  • When it comes to shades, brunettes are the most diverse
  • Brunettes appear to go gray earlier than other people because the lighter strands are more visible in darker hair.[3]
References

1Agency. “Are these the Most Beautiful Faces in the World?The Telegraph. March 30, 2015. Accessed: November 22, 2016.

2Aol. "Blondes vs. Brunettes: What your Hair Color Says about You." Aol. August 25, 2013. Accessed: November 30, 2016.

3Boldrini, Giovanna. “Are You a Blonde, Brunette, or Redhead? Here’s the Real Story Behind Your Hair.” Little Things. 2014. Accessed: November 23, 2016.

4Booth, Stephanie. “10 Fascinating Facts about Brunettes.” The Stir. December 16, 2015. Accessed: November 22, 2016.

5Brunet.” Merriam-Webster.com. 2016. Accessed: November 26, 2016.

6Dovey, Dana. “Brunette, Blonde, or Red: What Your Hair Color May Say About Your Health.” Medical Daily. May 29, 2014. Accessed: November 23, 2016.

7Euepedia. "Frequency of Fair Hair in Europe." Euepedia. 2016. Accessed: November 30, 2016.

8Gray, Richard. “Charles Darwin Investigated Whether Blondes Have More Fun.” The Telegraph. August 9, 2008. Accessed: November 25, 2016.

9Harlan, Ron. “10 Incredible Facts about Human Hair.” Listverse. November 27, 2013. Accessed: November 26, 2016.

10Heid, Markham. “The Hair Color that Makes You Horny.” Men’s Health. September 30, 2012. Accessed: November 23, 2016.

11Loftus, Valerie. “Did you Know Most Winning Roses are Brunette? And Other Facts on the Rose of Tralee.” The Daily Edge. August 16, 2014. Accessed: November 25, 2016.

12Pearson, Helen. "Lionesses Prefer Brunettes." Nature. August 23, 2002. Accessed: December 1, 2016.

13Ramsey, Monique. “Six Scientific Differences (and Facts) Between Blondes and Brunettes.” Cosmetic Social Media. June 18, 2016. Accessed: November 24, 2016.

14Roberts-Grey, Gina. “Brunettes have More Beaus? Hair Color Facts.” Today Health. Updated April 23, 2010. Accessed: November 23, 2016.

15Sherrow, Victoria. Encyclopedia of Hair: A Cultural History. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2006.

16Stenn, Kurt. Hair: A Human History. New York, NY: Pegasus Books LLC, 2016.

17Weitz, Rose. Rapunzel’s Daughter. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004.

18Wood, Hollee. “100 Random Facts about Hair.” HolleeWoodHair. May 10, 2012. Accessed: November 26, 2016.

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